"Always continue the climb. It is possible for you to do whatever you choose, if you first get to know who you are and are willing to work with a power that is greater than ourselves to do it."

~ Ella Wheeler Wilcox

12 October 2011 ·

This is one of those days when I really wanted to write a blog and tell you all about my awesome diabetes day. How I rode my bike throughout the weekend and didn’t drop low. How I caught a low before it got dangerous. How I proudly began taking my blood sugar in public. But I have been busy with two midterms and a project so I have seriously NO TIME to blog today! :( But never fear I will be writing about these amazing steps in becoming a confident, healthy diabetic. It just wont be today.
HAPPY MONDAY!
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You can now “like” humaBLOG on Facebook! Facebook.com/humaBLOG
Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  
Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 
Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Why not leave a comment below?

This is one of those days when I really wanted to write a blog and tell you all about my awesome diabetes day. How I rode my bike throughout the weekend and didn’t drop low. How I caught a low before it got dangerous. How I proudly began taking my blood sugar in public. But I have been busy with two midterms and a project so I have seriously NO TIME to blog today! :( But never fear I will be writing about these amazing steps in becoming a confident, healthy diabetic. It just wont be today.

HAPPY MONDAY!

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You can now “like” humaBLOG on Facebook! Facebook.com/humaBLOG

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Why not leave a comment below?

10 October 2011 ·

No D Day (With a side of D)

So today is no D Day, meaning this blog will not say the word diabetes. (Other than just then when I said Diabetes, oh and there too) I have been thinking on what I would write on as a blog NOT about diabetes (ah I said it again). After much consideration I’ve decided to write about my Dog, Daisy (who’s nickname is D, see what I did there?)

Daisy is my best friend. I do almost everything with her, and if I could take her everywhere I would. We go on adventures through the park together, we go on road trips, and yes we even sleep in the same bed. She has been my best friend for almost 10 years now and I am very thankful that I have her in my life.

We adopted daisy when I was 10 years old from a shelter in a town near our home. When we first visited the shelter I walked through the kennel area and was blown away by the loud barking coming from all directions. At this shelter before you take your pet home you get to spend time with them in a private room and sort of interview them.

The first dog we “interviewed” was named Max. He was a large dog and so very sweet. He was really soft and cuddly, but was a bit hyper. My little sister was only 5 years old at the time and we were afraid that he might knock her over if we took him home. So we had to say no to his sad little eyes and move on to our next “interviewee”.

Another look through the kennel with my dad was looking grim. All the dogs were so loud and I was so sad that I couldn’t take them all home. But then we got to one kennel that I had overlooked before. There was this sweet, medium sized, underweight, red colored dog with the softest ears I have ever felt.  All the dogs around her were barking and gnawing at the fence while this dog was calmly laying down and didn’t come to the fence until we began talking to her. My dad reached in to pet her and she set her head in his hand. Without a doubt we brought this dog into the interview room.

While in the kennel she had been taught to sit and shake hands. So when we told her to sit she sat right next to my mom. When she said “shake” she shook my hand. Her sad little eyes had a story to tell and her poor little ears had been bitten by fleas. She had such a calm misdemeanor and didn’t bark once. We decided that this was the dog for our family and began the adoption process.

Before we could bring her home the shelter had to update her on all of her shots and she needed to be spayed, so we didn’t get our new puppy for a few days. But the day we went to go pick up our new family member was filled with excitement. We got her a new collar as well as a leash and when we put it around her neck you could see happiness fill her eyes. She wagged her tail so hard that she almost knocked over the display unit in the waiting room.

We thought the ride home would be hard as we only had a car to drive her home in. But she seemed to love it. She sat right next to me in the back seat and looked out the window. She was ready to go to her new home and we were ready to have her.

She was only a little hyper when she got home. She wasn’t sure how the whole walking on a leash thing worked and whenever the front door opened she darted out of it. But she was very protective of my sister and I. Once I was just outside the front door talking to a friend (who happened to be a boy) and she was so upset. She began barking at the window with her scary low bark and I was ignoring her. She ended up busting through the window to protect me from this “threat”. That being said, I don’t think that this dog could hurt a fly (maybe a squirrel, but not a fly), and her bark is definitely worse than her bite. Lets just say she’s a good judge of personality when it comes to people.

Now were here about 10 years later and she is the best friend anyone could ask for. She is always there for me and never complains. (As long as she gets her walks once in a while) She protects me, loves me, and puts up with my crazy antics. She was with me through a hard year and she never left my side even when I was at my worst.

Daisy you are my best friend I love you care for you befriend you and you do all the same and more for me. Also sorry about making you take a bath the other day, I hope you’ll forgive me. 

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

You can now “like” humaBLOG on Facebook! Facebook.com/humaBLOG

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Also Daisy has a Twitter! You can follow her at @daisydogd

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Why not leave a comment below?

7 October 2011 ·

Bikes, Basal Rates, and Blood Sugars

As you may have read in a previous blog post, I was having some trouble with some sneaky lows while I was exercising. (Mostly when I rode my bike) I decided to make a couple Vlog style videos last week documenting my new approach to exercise.

I honestly never used Temporary Basal rates before just a few months ago. After much work with them while I was sick, I decided to try one out when I was exercising to combat lows. Below is a Vlog style video that is not really the same type of video you may have come to expect from humaBLOG. But I hope you like it all the same!

Let me know if you have any other ways to combat low blood sugars while exercising!

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

You can now “like” humaBLOG on Facebook! Facebook.com/humaBLOG

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Why not leave a comment below?

5 October 2011 ·

The Sneaky Low

Last week I had a “fun” low experience while at school. You know what that means! STORYTIME!

I woke up last Thursday feeling pretty good. Blood glucose was at 99 mg/dl and feeling pretty steady. I went ahead and ate some breakfast and took my normal bolus. When I was just about to head out the door I realized that I had forgotten to change my site the night before (oops!) I grabbed some insulin and a site change and was out the door. When I arrived at school I popped on a new site and filled up on insulin and was on my way to class.  

Toward the end of my first class I was feeling a little “weird”. I decided that it was maybe because I was low so instead of stepping out of class to test I unplugged my pump so I wouldn’t miss the very end of class.

After class ended I walked by a vending machine and grabbed a regular soda, just in case. But I still wasn’t feeling that  low. I headed into my math class and pulled out my meter for a quick test. 30! What I didn’t see that coming at all. I began chugging down the regular soda and before I finished it class began.

Because I didn’t want to be wondering around the school treating this low I stayed at my desk and tried as hard as I could to concentrate. (Which was harder than it sounds) By the end of class I was feeling a lot better and headed to lunch after a quick check told me I was back to normal range.

The whole point of this story was that I was just so surprised that this 30 mg/dl snuck up on me like that. I feel that I am normally pretty in tune with my body. I usually can tell when I am dropping and catch a low before it gets pretty dangerous. But this shows that diabetes is unpredictable, and even though I did everything I could to make my blood sugar be in normal range for the day I was still really low. 

"Either you run the day or the day runs you.
Jim Rohn

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

You can now “like” humaBLOG on facebook! Facebook.com/humaBLOG

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Why not leave a comment below?

3 October 2011 ·

The One About Fundraising

Wow you all really like you’re sweetener! Thanks for all of your responses and stay tuned, next week I will be doing a post about sweetener! Now on to this post:


Happy Friday! I hope you all have enjoyed you’re weeks as much as I’ve enjoyed mine. By far the most exciting part of my week this week was when I reached my fundraising goal.

I’ve been collection donations for the Annual American Diabetes Association Walk for Diabetes that is occurring this Sunday (Oct. 2nd). My goal was $200 and so far I’ve raised $220! I’m super pumped for the walk on Sunday! I can’t wait to see friends and meet new diabetics that live near me!

We are raising money under the name “Camp Granada Crusaders”, to send a child with diabetes to Diabetes Camp!

Here’s were you can help STOP diabetes! Head over to my personal donations page by either clicking the “Support My Walk” button to the right of this post on my website. Or you can head over to My Personal Walk Page.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is a really cool association that runs really awesome programs to get diabetic together to share stories and information, and that’s what humaBLOG is all about.

Thanks for all of your support and stay tuned for three new posts next week (one is a vlog!). Have a great weekend and think about the ADA on Sunday, because I know I will be!

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Why not leave a comment below?

30 September 2011 ·

A Sweet Little Question

Inquiring minds would like to know (mostly mine)

Just a short question for today’s post.

Do you use sweetener?

If so what kind, and what do you add it to?

If not why not?

Have you heard of a new type of sweetener?

I’ve personally always been a Sweet ‘N Low gal, but when Splenda came out I jumped ship.

How about you? Just leave a comment below or @ reply me on twitter and let me know! 

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Why not leave a comment below?

28 September 2011 ·

It’s Storytime!

Once upon a time there was a little pump site. He was manufactured by a company called Medtronic. He was packaged and sent with his brothers and sisters to a lucky college student in Illinois. Yesterday she opened his temporary plastic house and attached him to her leg. He was real happy pumping insulin to the girl whose pancreas has been thirteen years retired. Then that night while the girl was sleeping this little pump site decided he liked the idea of retirement as well and he jumped off the girl’s leg, without her knowing.

She woke up the next morning feeling like she had been hit by a truck (of sand). Being the diligent little diabetic that she is, she tested her blood sugar and discovered why she was feeling this way. She then looked down to check on her faithful pump, and finally Mr. Pump Site. She quickly replaced him with one of his sister pump sites and took some much needed insulin. 

An hour later her blood sugar dropped to 93 mg/dl and she exclaimed how happy she was that her blood sugar had dropped so quickly. She went on to get ready for her Monday. Then she suddenly started feeling odd. She decided to check once more to find out that her blood sugar had dropped to 30 mg/dl!  

She began to eat some carbohydrates, maybe too many carbs. All she wanted to do was to feel normal again. But she didn’t feel low really, she just felt lost, scared, and confused. After checking her blood sugar once more about ten minutes later, she saw that she had only gone to 42 mg/dl. Meaning that she must had been dropping pretty steadily before she checked this second time. After eating another “carby” snack, she had finally got into normal range, just in time to get some lunch before she headed to work. 

After lunch, the little diabetic cautiously took some insulin and was on her way to work. Trouble reared it’s ugly head again as soon as she arrived at work. After a quick bg check she discovered her blood sugar was 505 mg/dl! “Here we go again” she muttered as she began to take a correction bolus. Then she saw that she was so caught up with the low blood sugar that had happened almost an hour before that she failed to realize that she was extremely low on insulin. So she made an emergency call to her mother and her grandmother came to the rescue bringing her some insulin.

She sits here right now “fighting” her high blood sugar feeling, gulping down bottle after bottle of water. Hoping she drops but does not drop too low again.

As you may have guessed this young adult diabetic is me. “NO WAY”—yes my friend, it was me this morning/afternoon. This story is a huge reason why I really think I need a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System. Not just because of today but because this happens at least once a week. I’ll admit that sometimes the stress of college may be getting to me and maybe I am missing something. But that is a firm reason why I have decided to make a movement to get a CGM.  Wish me luck!

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Please leave a comment below!

26 September 2011 ·

The Battles of Blood Sugar

I love sharing stories of my life when Diabetes doesn’t stop me from doing what I want to do. But sometimes that isn’t the case. The last few days I feel like I have been at war with my body to do what I want to do. Here’s the story:


So I have been really getting into riding my bike, for these reasons.

  • I love riding my bike!
  • I got a new bike this summer and I haven’t got to ride it at all this summer.
  • It’s actually a nice temperature outside!
  • My allergies and asthma are finally done fighting with me.
  • It seems like my lung problem has subsided for now!
  • I love riding my bike!
  • I want to lose some weight!
  • I got a really cool new app that tracks my miles.
  • Did I mention I love riding my bike?!

I am trying to get on a schedule to juggle school, work, blogging, and my health and so this is one of those activities I am trying to do more regularly.

Well this week has been pretty stressful and just has left me exhausted. Other than having a GIANT test and a quiz I’ve been studying feverishly for, my diabetes has been, well lets say she’s been a bit “fussy”.

It all began this weekend. For some reason I’ve been waking up with lows. I’ve been moving basal rates around but to no avail I cannot get a handle on these AM bgs yet. (But, I’ll get there eventually) So this weekend I woke up with some doozies of blood sugars. The lowest I woke up at this weekend was on Sunday when I woke up at 35 mg/dl and I couldn’t feel my legs.

I fumbled for the glucose tabs in my meter bag and made my way slowly down the stairs to kitchen where I had a carb free-for-all. Finally I got the bg back in normal range and began my day. I ended up with a high bg later in the afternoon, followed by another low for dinner (Do you see where this is going?). 

Anyway Monday morning comes along and what do you know I wake up low again. However, not nearly as low as before. I treat and eat some breakfast, and get ready for the day. Then I decided I would go on a short 1 mile bike ride.

Before I left I tested and I was 80 mg/dl. A little bit too low to go on a ride. I angrily gulped down some milk and jumped on the bike. A mile later I returned home and checked and I was up to 113 mg/dl. NICE, thanks diabetes! However, the rest of the day I was on the dia-coster AGAIN. My highest this time was at work when I was around 390 mg/dl (ew). So, I decided to move around some basals AGAIN and try again tomorrow.

So now we are to Tuesday and by far the most tragic of my story. I was in class all morning and when I got home I grabbed some lunch and was excited to go one another bike ride. Possibly more than a mile would be great! When I checked pre-ride I was at 130 mg/dl. Awesome! I packed the meter and a few snacks and I was off.

About half a mile in I realized that I forgot my inhaler so I had to take a quick break and just chill. I decided to check and I had dropped to 80 mg/dl. Had a snack and jumped back on. My dads house is about 0.88 miles from my house (thanks Nike+!) and to get there I have to cross a big field and up a steep hill. I pumped my way across the field and felt my legs begin to give. By the time I got to the hill I was killer tired and feeling the low. (Having a flash back now of when I fell all the way up that very same hill when I was low while rollerblading)

I finally got to the house and got time to sit and check again. 57, glucosed myself up and waited. After fifteen minutes I went down to 47 mg/dl. What the heck diabetes! Okay, I had no worries as I drank a regular soda. Finally I got up to 78 mg/dl and then finally 115 mg/dl. Then I headed home feeling like diabetes had beat me up thoroughly. 

I usually don’t feel so bad after a low, I know its sometimes not my fault and that it just happens. I don’t like this feeling, I don’t like when I feel that diabetes is keeping me from doing something I want to do. All I can do is stay strong and try again tomorrow. Tomorrow is a new day, and to quote my good ole’ pal Annie, "It’s always a day away".

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Please leave a comment below!

21 September 2011 ·

The One About Hiding My Diabetes

I am proud to be diabetic. I truly believe that diabetes has made me who I am today. But there are sometimes when I just want to be “normal”. I hate to say it but sometimes I hide my diabetes. 

I wear a very visible pink insulin pump on my pocket every day. I wear a medical alert bracelet, and drive my car with my “Diabetic Driver” sticker, and JDRF magnet. Yet I manage to let Inner Rachel take over from time to time and talk me into hiding diabetes. 

I am working on changing this mindset. I used to have it down to a science. I wouldn’t tell people I had diabetes until they asked. I never wanted someone to learn about my diabetes when they first met me. I don’t know why I did this. (I blame Inner Rachel) I guess I never wanted to be remembered as that “Diabetic Girl”. But why not?

The thought takes me back to when I was eight years old. I was at a restaurant with my parents. It was insulin time and my mom let me know it was time to take my injection in the restroom. I told her that I wanted to take it at the table, and that maybe she could give it to me in my arm. She obliged and drew up my insulin and injected. As I looked around I saw all the eyes affixed on me and my mother. I couldn’t help but wonder what they were thinking. But it really didn’t bother me too much because I had my mom, who had to give herself her own injection just moments after. 

It started to bother me for the first time when I was in junior high school. First I should say that at the beginning of junior high I had just started on my insulin pump, and to give me more independence my parents allowed me to give my own insulin without visiting the nurses office unless I needed her help. So I was at the lunch table about to test my blood sugar just before cracking open my lunch box, when a lunch supervisor stood behind me. “What are you doing?” she asked. “I am taking my blood sugar” then a received the same stare as before when I was in the restaurant with my family. “You can’t do that here. It’s not sanitary” I proceeded to tell her that I had special permission to take my blood sugar anywhere in the school, but she was not keen to listening to me. 

She told me to go see the principal, so I went to the nurses office. I told the nurse what had happened and I wasn’t in trouble but the lunch, recess and before and after school supervisors were instructed how to handle diabetes.

I just felt humiliated and I began to hide my meter when I was testing or discreetly take a bolus. Which isn’t bad but I feel that people with diabetes shouldn’t have to hide their disease from the public. It’s not like we want to gross people out or be unsanitary. It’s not like we chose  to have this disease.

Anyway, I am working to become more outward with my diabetes. I want people to know about this invisible disease! Heck, if someone asks about why I am poking my finger in public then that’s just one more person who will be educated. I personally feel that it is now my duty to educate people about Diabetes as much as possible, and here is one more way I can. All people with diabetes can do it with me, lets work on NOT hiding diabetes anymore. I am proud to be a Diabetic and I am proud to say I work hard everyday to manage this disease!

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This really long and poorly written post was written by Rachel Scott.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @rachellynnae  

Don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube: humaBLOG 

Have a story you want to share? Have a question or suggestion? Please leave a comment below!

16 September 2011 ·

About Me

A really cool blog, by a really cool girl, telling really cool stories about a not so cool disease called Type 1 Diabetes.